BURNING WAVES


#1

fd


#2

Sweet nice ship :smiley: :smiley: is it a cruiser or battleship, can’t wait to try it out :no4:


#3

Baltimore Class heavy Cruiser.

i wiki’d for it instead of just reading hte filename, duuuuuuh :laughing:


#4

gj


#5

hate this thing


#6

fucking railings n shit


#7

man… that thing needs some awesome effects on that guns… ingame… what about torpedos by the way? does it have tubes?


#8

that is friggin awsome!


#9

IIRC the Baltimore-class didn’t have them. Heavy cruisers and capital ships were primarily intended as gun combatants (although some European designs such as the British Nelson-class and the Bismarck had torpedo tubes). Destroyers and small boats were the primary surface torpedo platforms. The Japanese often found out the hard way that while torpedo tubes add extra punch, they are also an exposed, lightly-armored container for a large amount of TNT in a gunfight or air attack.


#10

haha I asked that because I play Battlestations Pacific Demo at the moment :slight_smile: xD


#11

Naval combat, at least late-war, is kind of going to be the opposite of what you see in Spring 1944 - i.e., the Americans will usually have the decisive edge. Once they got the hang of using radar in conjunction with state-of-the-art (for the day) fire control systems, they usually had the upper hand in range and accuracy. AAA batteries were pretty vicious too; the Baltimore class carried 12 5-inch dual-purpose guns firing radar-fused shells, 48 40 mm Bofors, and 24 20 mm cannons. Roughly double that for the Iowa-class battleships.


#12

Just to show that Spiked isn’t the only one who makes cruisers…
[attachment=0]cruiser.png[/attachment]


#13

More complete (but not 100% yet).
[attachment=0]cruiser2.png[/attachment]


#14

Have a cookie. This thread just made my day. :smiley:


#15

Even more complete (but I intend to add some more detail).
[attachment=0]cruiser.png[/attachment]


#16

What class of cruiser is that?


#17

Project 26-bis cruiser. Does not fall strictly into light/heavy classification, because USSR was not a part of Washington/London naval treaties which enforced light/heavy cruiser distinctions.

By treaty standards it would be considered heavy (180mm main guns, more than 155mm allowed for lights), but in USSR it was later classed as light (because of weak armor).


#18

god how do you make the hull? it’s friggin hard to get that shape.


#19

I use ‘cut’ drawings. They are known as ‘theoretic drawings’ in Russian, not sure what the proper English term would be.

Something like that: (it’s not the cruiser, but some random boat the drawing for which was first in google results)

This gives accurate hull form (sometimes too accurate, and I skip some of the cuts). Then I use 2-view (top+side) drawings to make superstructure, weapons and such.


#20

A new ship.

[attachment=0]uragan.png[/attachment]

USSR had a need for dedicated patrol/coast guard ships from early 1920s, yet first ships were completed nearly 10 years later. Those were first surface warships built in USSR completely (as opposed to finishing WW1-era Imperial ships which were still in the yards when Revolution began).

The ship was inspired by WW1 torpedo boats and destroyers (hence the triple torpedo tube). Initial AA armament was adequate for 1920s era, but completely useless in late 30s, so additional AA guns were installed shortly before WW2 (together with replacing main guns for 100mm ones). As the ship was not designed for them, they limited firing arcs of the main guns somewhat.

Because of their names (Uragan = hurricane, Purga = blizzard, Tucha = storm cloud, etc., 18 in total) those ships became known as “bad weather division”.